Features and Blogs

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A fisherman goes out in search of Piranha on Lake Iranduba, in the Amazon region of Brazil. - Photo: World Bank/Flickr

Ricardo Martinez-Lagunes, Inter-regional Adviser on Environmental Economic Accounts in the UN, demystifies water accounts and explains how countries are using them to inform policy decisions.

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Two giraffes fight at the Samburu National Park. - Photo: Shutterstock

Measuring the value of forests and their related ecosystems through "forest accounts" is helping countries set their economic priorities.

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Laura Chinchilla, President of Costa Rica, addresses the audience at a natural capital event during Rio+20 conference on June 20, 2012. - Photo: Mariana Ceratti/World Bank

62 countries, 90 corporations, 17 civil society members supported the 50-50 campaign in Rio+20 in June. They are coming together for a High Level Ministerial Dialogue in Washington DC on April 18.

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View of Lake of the Cloud at the Porcupine Mountains State Park in northern Michigan, USA. - Photo: Shutterstock

A WAVES Policy and Technical Experts Committee has been set up to develop a methodology for ecosystem valuation and help countries incorporate them in national accounts.

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Cover Image of Moving Beyond GDP report

A new report (pdf) shows that 24 countries are already using natural capital accounting in their economic decision making. By fully accounting for minerals and energy, fisheries, water, forests, and ecosystems, countries can provide more accurate information to their policy makers.

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Governments, private sector leaders and other stakeholders are getting behind the '50:50' campaign, which brings together public and private sector institutions to express their joint support for factoring natural capital into their decision making.

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Green Trees and Lake

The Phil-WAVES mission in the Philippines this February demonstrated the successful convergence of theory and practice of natural capital accounting.

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Declining stocks of forests, farmland, fish and other natural resources threaten to derail economic growth around the world and curb progress against poverty, the World Bank warned on Wednesday. To prevent this, countries need to move toward more resource-efficient “green growth”, said Rachel Kyte, the bank’s vice president for sustainable development.

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Coral reefs near Madagascar

The WAVES program in Madagascar has been endorsed by the Cabinet, representing a strong demonstration of the government’s commitment to the program.

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Feeding Plant

Every country in the world should measure ‘natural capital’ as well as GDP in order to create a global economy that values the environment as well as money according to the Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman.

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